Smokey Joe

Think back a few years, you’re sitting in a club, it’s 3am, the place is absolutely heaving and everyone is smoking. The entire club is a fog of cigarette smoke and no one is even slightly bothered. Can you imagine that now? Funny how times change and how quickly!!

You can give up smoking – Day 24

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Some handy links:
http://www.quitnow.info.au
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/tobacco/consquits.htm
http://www.lifeclinic.com/focus/smoking/default.asp
http://www.smokenders.com
http://quitsmoking.about.com

How I learned to stop worrying and just stop smoking

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After extensive cutting and pasting I came to the conclusion that there was no right or wrong way to quit smoking and that every person has different needs. My key concerns were:

  • Detoxing and flushing out the nicotine as quickly as possible
  • Dealing with the munchies, increased appetite and consequently weight gain
  • Having something to do with my hands
  • Stopping myself going mental

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To combat these I have:

  • Consumed at least 3 litres of water a day
  • Stopped caffeine consumption
  • Gone a bit mental
  • Eaten loads of vegetables, nuts and seeds
  • Taken Cortitrim 3 times a day
  • Slept well

Most of these items are obvious, Cortitrim is detailed below…

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Cortitrim

This complementary medicine is used to:

* Aid or assist the body to adapt and cope with stressful situations and the effects of emotions, biological and environmental stress.
* Aid in the management stress hormone levels
* Assist with weight loss and weight management in conjunction with a diet and exercise program.
* Reduce calorie intake by suppressing the appetite.
* Regulate the metabolism of carbohydrates and fat.
* Improve physical and mental performance.
* Aid fat loss and promotes lean body mass, improving body composition.
* Improve energy levels and vitality in times of fatigue exhaustion tiredness
* Provide nutritional support for those embarking on an exercise and diet program
* Provide an antioxidant action

How does CortiTrim work?
Siberian Ginseng and Ashwagandha are adaptogenics, or anti-stress herbs, which exhibit an extraordinary capacity for enhancing our adaptive responses by exerting a non specific normalizing effect on our bodies. Adaptogenics can prevent stress from taking such a toll on our nervous, immune and hormonal systems. They promote adaptability to all types of stress, including environmental and emotional. Green Tea, Siberian Ginseng, and Withania assist physical fitness by improving physical performance, energy level by reducing fatigue tiredness and exhaustion that might be experienced during times of stress or strenuous diet and exercise programs. Cortitrim also contains B-complex and Chromium to aid in the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, improve body composition and assist in fat loss and to help nutritional support during a low calorie diet program.

What results can I expect from Cortitrim?
Although results will vary from person to person due to metabolic and hormonal factors, when used in conjunction with proper diet and exercise Cortitrim may help reduce overall stress levels in as little as a few days, a visible reduction in belly fat within four to six weeks, and significant results within three months.

I really want a cigarette

no smoking 

Why do you smoke?


You can control your smoking once you know why you smoke. Here is a checklist provided by world renowned chest physicians based on their experience. Check the probable reasons that come closest to yours in the list given below and also go through the ways you can cope with this problem if you want to quit smoking.

1. Smoking gives me more energy.

If you answer “often” or “sometimes” to the following questions, this is one reason you smoke.

  • I smoke to keep from slowing down.
  • I reach for a cigarette when I need a lift.
  • When I’m tired, smoking perks me up.

Many people use tobacco like they use coffee: to help them wake up, get moving, keep going when they feel worn out. The nicotine in tobacco, like the caffeine in coffee, is a stimulant. But you can find other ways to get more energy. These tips can help.

TIPS TO HELP YOU QUIT

  • Get enough rest. With a good night’s sleep you’re more likely to feel fresh and alert.
  • Exercise regularly. Regular exercise raises your overall energy level, so you may feel less need for a boost.
  • Take a brisk walk instead of smoking if you start feeling sluggish. Moving around is a drug-free stimulant.
  • Eat regular, nutritious meals. Healthful foods are a great natural source of energy.
  • Drink lots of cold water. It will refresh you as it helps clear your body of nicotine.
  • Avoid getting bored, which can make you feel tired. Keep your mind active, perhaps by calling a friend, reading a new magazine, or playing a game.

2. I like to touch and handle cigarettes.

Quiz: Do you smoke for this reason?
If you answer “often” or “sometimes” to the fol-lowing questions, this is one reason you smoke.

  • I feel more comfortable with a cigarette in my hand.
  • I enjoy getting a cigarette out of the pack and lighting up.
  • I like to watch the smoke when I exhale.

This type of smoker gets physical pleasure from handling cigarettes and the rituals of smoking. It just “feels right” to have a cigarette in his hand or mouth. In fact, many smokers say they’ve gone back to smoking because, “I had nothing to do with my hands.”

Getting over this obstacle can make it easier to quit smoking and stay smoke-free. The tips below suggest other ways to satisfy the handling urge.

TIPS TO HELP YOU QUIT

  • Pick up a pen or pencil when you want to reach for a cigarette.
  • Play with a coin, twist your ring, or handle whatever harmless object is nearby.
  • Put a plastic cigarette in your hand or mouth.
  • Some have a minty taste to help you focus on how fresh your breath is without tobacco.
  • Hold a real cigarette if the touch is all you miss. But if handling a cigarette makes you want to light up, stick with the substitutes.
  • Eat regular meals to avoid being hungry. Don’t confuse needing to eat with the desire to put a cigarette in your mouth.
  • Take up a hobby that keeps your hands busy.
  • Try knitting, carpentry, painting, or making bread.

3. Smoking is a pleasure.

Quiz: Do you smoke for this reason?
If you answer “often” or “sometimes” to the following questions, this is one reason you smoke.

  • Smoking cigarettes is pleasant and enjoyable.
  • Smoking makes good times better.
  • I want a cigarette most when I am comfortable and relaxed.

Almost two out of three smokers say they just plain enjoy smoking. When you associate smoking with “the good times,” it can strengthen your smoking habit. But it can be easier to quit when you focus on enjoying yourself without tobacco. The tips below offer some ideas to help you miss cigarettes less.

TIPS TO HELP YOU QUIT

  • Enjoy the pleasures of being tobacco-free.
  • Spend the money you save on cigarettes on another kind of pleasure: a shopping spree, a night out, a party to celebrate your success.
  • Remind yourself of the health benefits of quitting.
  • Giving up cigarettes can help you enjoy life’s other pleasures for many years to come.

4. Smoking helps me relax when I’m tense or upset.

Quiz: Do you smoke for this reason?
If you answer “often” or “sometimes” to the following questions, this is one reason you smoke.

  • I light up a cigarette when something makes me angry.
  • Smoking relaxes me in a stressful situation.
  • When I’m depressed I reach for a cigarette to feel better.

Lots of smokers use cigarettes to help them through bad times. If you’ve used cigarettes as a crutch, finding another way to cope with stress can help you stay quit. Otherwise, you may want to smoke again whenever problems arise. The tips below include ideas that have helped former smokers handle tense times without tobacco.

TIPS TO HELP YOU QUIT

  • Use relaxation techniques to calm down when you are angry or upset. Deep breathing exercises, muscle relaxation, and imagining yourself in a peaceful setting can make you feel less stressed.
  • Exercise regularly. Studies show that exercise relieves tension and improves your mood.
  • Remember that smoking never solves the problem; figure out what will, and act.
  • Avoid or get out of stressful situations that might tempt you to smoke.
  • Get enough rest. Take time each day to relax, no matter how busy you are.
  • Enjoy relaxation. Take a long hot bath. Have a massage. Lie in a garden hammock. Listen to soothing music.

5. I crave cigarettes ; I am addicted to smoking

Quiz: Do you smoke for this reason?
If you answer “often” or “sometimes” to the following questions,this is one reason you smoke.

  • When I run out of cigarettes, it’s almost unbearable until I get more.
  • I am very aware of not smoking when I don’t have a cigarette in my hand.
  • When I haven’t smoked for a while I get a gnawing hunger for a cigarette.

Many smokers are addicted or “hooked” on the nicotine in tobacco. When addicted smokers quit, many go through a withdrawal period. They may have both physical symptoms (feeling tired and irritable; headaches; nervousness) and an emotional need for a cigarette. One ex-smoker compared his continued craving for cigarettes to the longing you feel for a lost love.

It isn’t easy to get over an addiction to tobacco, but many people have succeeded often on a second or third try. But once you’re back in control, you won’t have to beat smoking again. For many ex-smokers, that’s a powerful motivation to stay tobacco-free. The tips below include ideas to help addicted smokers make it through withdrawal and stay away from cigarettes for good.

TIPS TO HELP YOU QUIT

  • Ask your doctor about using some medication to help you avoid withdrawal symptoms.
  • Smoke more than you want to for a day or two before you quit. This “overkill” may spoil your taste for cigarettes.
  • Tell family and friends you’ve quit smoking. Ask for help if you need it. Keep away from cigarettes completely. Get rid of ashtrays. Destroy any cigarettes you have. Try to avoid people who smoke and smoke-filled places like bars if you’re having withdrawal symptoms or cigarette cravings.
  • Think of yourself as a non-smoker. Hang up “No Smoking” signs.
  • Don’t relive your days as a smoker.
  • Remember that physical withdrawal symptoms last about two weeks. Hang on!

6. Smoking is a habit.

Quiz: Do you smoke for this reason?
If you answer “often” or “sometimes” to the following questions, this is one reason you smoke.

  • I smoke cigarettes automatically without being aware of it.
  • I light up a cigarette without realizing I have one burning in an ashtray.
  • I find a cigarette in my mouth and don’t remember putting it there.

If you are this kind of smoker, you are no longer getting much satisfaction from your cigarettes. Unlike people who smoke for pleasure, you might not miss it very much if you stopped. The key is breaking your smoking patterns. The tips below can help.

TIPS TO HELP YOU QUIT

  • Cut down gradually. Smoke fewer cigarettes each day or only smoke them halfway down. Inhale less often and less deeply. After several months it should be easier to stop completely.
  • Change your smoking routines. Keep your cigarettes in a different place. Smoke with your opposite hand. Don’t do anything else while smoking.
  • Limit smoking to certain places, such as outside or in one room at home.
  • When you want a cigarette, wait one minute. Try to think of something else to do instead of smoking.
  • Be aware of every cigarette you smoke. Ask yourself: Do I really want this cigarette? You may be surprised at how many you can easily pass up.
  • Set a date for giving up smoking altogether and stick to it.

Stop smoking without gaining weight

Mr Creosote 

A two-month nutritional/lifestyle plan to quit without gaining weight

This plan works on the principle of stabilising blood sugar and hormone levels. Withdrawal effects from nicotine are a direct effect of its action on your blood sugar, so follow some basic nutritional principles: 1. Combine carbohydrate and protein foods – salmon and rice with salad, chicken stir fry with noodles, and so on.2. Eat 3 meals per day plus 2 healthy snacks.3. Eat foods rich in B vitamins (fish, green vegetables, wholegrains, mushrooms, eggs) and Vitamin C (peppers, watercress, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, lemons, kiwi fruit, oranges, tomatoes).4. Eat foods rich in magnesium (almonds, cashew nuts, green vegetables), calcium (cheese, almonds, seeds, green vegetables, prunes), zinc (lamb, seafood, nuts, fish, egg yolk, wholegrains) and iron (pumpkin seeds, almonds, cashew nuts, raisins, pork).5. Avoid refined/processed/sugary foods.6. Avoid other stimulants like coffee and tea if you can – drink more water, fruit and herbal teas. 

Stage 1: Breaking The Associated Habits 

It’s important to understand your smoking first – do you smoke when you are tired, hungry, upset, after a meal, with a drink? Keep a diary for 1 week (don’t attempt to change smoking habits at this stage), note every situation when you smoke – how do you feel before and after each cigarette? At the end of the week add up how many cigarettes you have smoked associated with each situation, forexample: After a meal – 6 cigarettesWith alcohol – 5 cigarettes If you spot smoking triggers write down how you could deal with them if you were to stop smoking – agood way to break a habit is to replace it with a new one. For another couple of weeks smoke as much as you like – but not with the associated habit – and continue until all you do is smoke without the associated habits. For example, if you normally smoke straight after a meal, wait at least 30 minutes until you have a cigarette. 

Stage 2: Reducing Your Nicotine Load – It can help to reduce your nicotine load slowly. 

Take supplements of 1,000mg of Vitamin C and 200mcg of chromium/50mg B3 daily (to help reduce cravings). Also to help reduce cravings – eat a diet high in fruit, vegetables and seeds. Whenever you feel a craving for a cigarette, first eat some fruit – this will raise a low blood sugar level, which is often the trigger for the craving.  Regular exercise can also help – exercise can reduce stress and is mood boosting. Now reduce the number of cigarettes to no more than 5 a day, each with a nicotine content of 2mg or less, or have nicotine gum (two strengths – 4mg and 2mg). You want to be down to a maximum of 10mg of nicotine a day before quitting. Although gradually cutting down works for some people, if this does not work for you it may be best to commit to a quit date and then give up completely. 

Stage 3: Time to Quit 

Giving up smoking is easier if you have support, even if it’s just encouragement from your friends and family.Your chances of successfully quitting are better still if you take nicotine replacement products, or prescription-only medicine. For people who commit to a quit date, these can be prescribed by GPs. Smokers who get professional help, including medicines, are four times more likely to successfully quit than people who try with willpower alone. 

Coping with difficult situations 

As smoking may have been part of your normal routine for so long, there will be occasions when it is especially difficult to resist cigarettes. Some tips to help you are listed below.

For a while after you quit, try to avoid places where lots of other people smoke or that you associate with smoking, such as pubs. Smoking is often associated with drinking alcohol.

If people offer cigarettes, ask them not to. Remind yourself that most smokers also wish they could stop. Say “No thanks, I am not a smoker”.

Avoid situations that you associate with smoking. For example, if you usually smoke after dinner, leave the table and do something else instead.

If you do have a lapse, don’t use it as an excuse to start smoking regularly. Many ex-smokers make the odd mistake, but remain smoke-free. 

BUPA’s Health Information Team, Penny Williams, Nutritional Therapist, LifeFirst, 2005, http://www.lifefirst.info

Stop Smoking – Good advice

monkey smoker

Why is it difficult to quit? The nicotine in tobacco smoke causes both physical and psychological dependence. This is a complex form of addiction as you will have a strong desire to smoke, even if you wish to stop. Smokers often continue smoking because they experience unpleasant withdrawal effects when they stop, including irritability, difficulty concentrating, craving for another cigarette, you may also gain weight as a consequence of giving up (but Q-active is here to prevent that!). Smoking is also a habit – it becomes associated with various emotional occasions, situations and events. For some people, this psychological dependence can be even harder to break than the physical addiction. If you’ve already tried to give up but you’re still smoking, accept that it was all part of the process for you. Trying again is simply a continuation of your original decision to give up. Most people who give up successfully have been through several attempts to quit. 

What do I gain from quitting?

 By stopping smoking, you can improve your health and enjoy a longer, healthier life. You will also save money – a 20-a-day smoker spends around $3,500 a year on cigarettes. As smoking also causes wrinkled, damaged skin, giving up is likely to make you look better and younger too.

Health – up in smoke

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