Give Blood in Sydney

blood cells  Everybody has a particular blood type. One gene from your mother and one from your father combine to establish your blood type. Those two genes form a protein (or antigen) that exists on the surface of all red blood cells, and which is capable of stimulating an immune response.In 1901, an Austrian scientist, Karl Landsteiner, found that reactions between substances present in the antigens, and other substances in plasma (antibodies) sometimes cause the red blood cells to clump together, causing adverse reactions in recipients. After further experiments, he found four blood groups based on the presence or absence of two specific antigens which we now know as A and B.

This discovery paved the way for a system of blood grouping called the ABO system

In 1939 and 1940, research involving rhesus monkeys identified another grouping factor which was called the Rhesus Factor (Rh factor). People, regardless of their ABO blood group, who were found to have a D antigen present were grouped as Rh positive and those without the D antigen were grouped as Rh negative. The rhesus group is indicated by a ‘+’ (Rh positive) or ‘-‘ (Rh negative) after a person’s ABO type e.g. A+ or O-. In a similar way to the ABO grouping, people who are Rh positive will have no Anti-D antibodies in their plasma, while those who are Rh negative will have Anti-D antibodies. All these groups are genetically based.

Are they compatible?

When a transfusion is given, it is preferable for patients to receive blood of the same ABO and Rh(D) group. However, in an emergency, if the required blood group is unavailable, a patient may be given another group as shown below.

The prevalence of blood types within the community is roughly similar to the demand for different blood types, which is why we always ask people of all blood types to give blood regularly.

http://www.donateblood.com.au/index.aspx

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2 Responses

  1. I would like to give my blood but i don’t know how can i do and where i can go?

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